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Certified Antiques Appraising Courses - on Campus

GL-201
GL-201 Art Glass of the World

This course is designed to familiarize the students with:
• how glass is made,
• history of glass, and
• how it relates to the art glass they will be called upon to identify and appraise.

The course teaches the students to identify many of the more important art glass types from Victorian to the early part of the twentieth century. Students are taught how to research types and prices of art glass of all kinds, over and above the approximately eighty-five types of art glass covered in this class.

The course syllabus
is located here.



GL-202
GL-202 American Glass
This course examines American glass production from its inception in the early 1600s through the 1950s.

The student will learn to identify approximate age through an understanding of the manufacturing techniques used to produce it, the style incorporated in its design, and the colors used. They will understand the marketplace, and references available to aid in determining value.

The course syllabus
is located here.










PO-301
PO-301 English and Continental Pottery
This course is designed to help students identify and date pottery and porcelain, in order to evaluate their place and significance in the marketplace and includes study of:
• clay,
• glazes,
• decoration,
• pattern,
• form, and
• makers' marks.

Emphasis will be on styles and techniques developed in England and Continental Europe from 1650 to 1950 and the influences from the Orient.

The course syllabus
is located here.








PO-302
PO-302 American Pottery
The study of American ceramics will help students identify, date, and evaluate pottery and porcelain, in order to determine their place and significance in the marketplace and includes the study of:
• clay,
• glazes,
• decoration,
• pattern,
• form, and
• makers' marks.
Emphasis will be on styles and techniques developed by both Native and non-Native North American potters up to today, including the significance of English, European, and Oriental contributions/ influences, and the impact of the contemporary technology explosion.

The course syllabus
is located here.






FR-401
FR-401 Furniture Through the Golden Age
Students will study the use and identifications of woods in furniture construction. They will also study:
• styles,
• motifs,
• construction,
• hardware,
• patina, and
• oxidation to date and evaluate handmade furniture.

Styles covered include Antiquity, Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo and Neo-classical. Students will learn how these styles were used to form the eclectic furniture of the Victorian and later periods.

The course syllabus
is located here.






FR-402
FR-402 Furniture of the Industrial Revolution
The elegant simplicity of the Neoclassical design that flourished in furniture design at the beginning of the 19th century was replaced by stylistic revivals during the Victorian era.

Later the reform movement brought the sinuous curves of Art Nouveau and the geometry of the Arts & Crafts movement, followed by the effects of the Industrial Revolution on the Art Deco style of furniture until the 1950's.

The course syllabus is located here.










JE-501
JE-501 Jewelry
This course traces the style of fashion that shaped the design of jewelry. Stones and metals will be identified and students will learn how they were combined to create unique patterns of elegance and style.

Identification and evaluation techniques will cover the following periods: Early Victorian, Mid-Victorian, Late Victorian, Art Nouveau, Art Deco, Moderne and Fashion Jewelry.

The course syllabus
is located here.








PR-601
PR-601 Early Americana/Primitives
Students will study various types of handmade and early items from Colonial America, Victorian period and into the early 20th century. This class will survey items used to make life easier, from fireplace items to the country store.

Topics will include: Native American artifacts, Pennsylvania Dutch items, early furniture, boxes, baskets, and needlework.

The course syllabus
is located here.






ME-801
ME-801 Metals
A study of metals and how they are used in antiques and collectibles: silver, silver plate, copper, bronze, pewter, and iron that were used for flatware, hollowware and other utilitarian hardware of the 17th to the 20th centuries.

The emphasis will be on American styles used throughout the home, beginning with Colonial times and continuing to the early part of the 20th century. Students will learn about the historical development of the use of metal, how American styles were influenced by European designs, and how to read the "hall marks".

The course syllabus
is located here.






AP-1000 Appraising Theory and Practice Laboratory
This course provides an overview of the legal problems facing the appraiser, the ethical standards of appraising, and the procedures involved in expert witnessing.

Students will complete a number of practice appraisals using methods described throughout the program. Students will inventory items provided by the instructor. Then they will have two weeks to do research, identify the items, state the value for each, and prepare an official appraisal document.



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